Susan Stanford Friedman On: "Twenty-One Love Poems"

Throughout "Twenty-One Love Poems," which form the structural center of The Dream of a Common Language, Manhattan serves as the alienating setting, representing the violent world which the lovers must inhabit, yet seek to transform with love and relationship. Just as H. D. started the Trilogy with her impressions of destruction on walking through her London neighborhood after a bombing raid, Rich began poem I of "Twenty-One Love Poems" with a walk through the city which produces images of violence. . . .

From Signs (1983).

Details

Criticism Overview
Title Susan Stanford Friedman On: "Twenty-One Love Poems" Type of Content Criticism
Criticism Author Susan Stanford Friedman Criticism Target Adrienne Rich
Criticism Type Poet Originally Posted 19 Oct 2014
Publication Status Excerpted Criticism Publication No Data
Printer Friendly PDF Version
Contexts No Data Tags alienation, violence, Transformation, love

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